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Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Dyeing of sisal and other plant fibres found in the catalog.

Dyeing of sisal and other plant fibres

A. J. Canning

Dyeing of sisal and other plant fibres

a handbook for craft instructors

by A. J. Canning

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Published by Tropical Development and Research Institute .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementA.J. Canning and C.G. Jarman. Supplement. Properties of selected dyes and sisal.
ContributionsJarman, C. G.
The Physical Object
Pagination25p.
Number of Pages25
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21548348M
ISBN 10085954172X

The key to successful results when you skip the use of a mordant relates to the plant materials you choose to make dye from, the fiber you want to dye, and the length of time it takes for the dye. plant fibre composites has only begun. Among the various natural fibres such as, sisal fibres, bamboo fibres, coir fibres and jute fibres are of particular interest as these composites have high impact strength besides having moderate tensile and flexural properties compared to other lignocellulosic fibres.

Lastly, consider the wonderful array of plant fibres, such as cotton, flax, linen and so on! When choosing a medium to dye, it is best to select a light color. Most natural wools and fibres come in varying shades of white or cream straight off the animal’s back – which is perfect. After washing, the fibre is dried and bleached in the sun, or oven-dried. Dyeing: Sisal has a good affinity for direct cotton and acid dyestuffs, which provide attractive shades of good light fastness. Direct dyestuffs are used in the same way as in the dyeing of cotton. Acid dyes are applied from a .

Although some flowers produce seeds, sisal plants are usually sterile and most propagation is by bulbils produced in the flower stalk, or by suckers that appear at the base of the plant. b) Sisal Fibre Sisal fibre is very long, with an average length of to m and it is creamy white to yellowish in colour.   Sisal, Natural Fibre, Textile Material, and Sustainable Fashion Today’s sustainable fibre will be sisal. Sisal is a fibre that is native to Mexico derived from the Agave plant.


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Dyeing of sisal and other plant fibres by A. J. Canning Download PDF EPUB FB2

Environmental concerns have regenerated interest in the use of natural fibers for a much wider variety of products, including high-tech applications such as geotextiles, and composite materials for automotive and light industry use. Covering minor as well as major fibers produced worldwide, Bast and Other Plant Fibers analyzes flax, hemp, jute, kenaf, ramie, sisal, coir, and nettle, and.

Best with natural fibres such as cotton, linen, wool, silk, jute, ramie and sisal. works on fibre and dye extraction among the communities mentioned above to study covered selected indigenous textile centres in the Ashanti, Volta and other potential yielding plants that are capable of producing fibres and dyes Plate: Interlacing of the.

Plant fibres are obtained from various parts of plants, such as the seeds (cotton, kapok, milkweed), stems (flax, jute, hemp, ramie, kenaf, nettle, bamboo), and leaves (sisal, manila, abaca), fruit (coir) and other grass fibres.

Fibres from these plants Cited by: Coir: Among vegetable fibres, coir has one of the highest concentrations of lignin, making it stronger but less flexible than cotton and unsuitable for tensile strength of coir is low compared to abaca, but it has good resistance to microbial action and salt water damage.

A coarse, short fibre extracted from the outer shell of coconuts, coir is found in ropes, mattresses, brushes. Sisal (/ ˈ s aɪ s əl /, Spanish:), with the botanical name Agave sisalana, is a species of Agave native to southern Mexico but widely cultivated and naturalized in many other countries.

It yields a stiff fibre used in making various products. The term sisal may refer either to the plant's common name or the fibre, depending on the context. It is sometimes referred to as "sisal hemp Family: Asparagaceae. Ponnusamy Senthil Kumar, Subburaj Suganya, in Sustainable Fibres and Textiles, Processing of organic fibres.

Processing of sustainable organic fibre starts with fibre extraction and yarn production followed by bleaching, dyeing, softening, printing and drying.

Organic or green decorticated fibre production depends on skilled labourers, an integrated infrastructure and the. In Tribology of Natural Fiber Polymer Composites, Physical structure of sisal fibers. Sisal fiber has a real density of g/cm 3 and an apparent density of g/cm 3, and its porosity is 17 %.Moisture regain is 11 % at 65 % relative humidity (RH) and 32 % at % RH.

1 The fiber is moderately crystalline. The spiral angle around the fiber axis is 20–25°. 1 Sisal fiber of. Das, P. [2] tells about the methods to extract sisal fiber from plant stem. The viscoelastic properties and water absorption properties of prepared samples calculated for fabricated.

It is whiter, longer, and weaker than sisal fiber. Because of its color, it is used in blends. Phormium. The Phormium tenax plant yields a long, light-colored, hard fiber also known as New Zealand hemp or flax, although it has none of the bast fiber characteristics.

The plant is a perennial of the Agavaceae with leaves up to 4 m long and 10 cm. Price and other details may vary based on size and color. LB Multicolored Natural Sisal Fiber Linen Silk Hemp Gift Package Wrapping Basket Filler Grass Stuffer.

out of 5 stars Sisal Rope for Cats, 1/4 inch Diameter, Natural Fiber Dye Free. out of 5 stars 31% off. $ $ 8. 99 $ $ Get it as soon as Mon. The plant Sisal fibres are obtained from Agave Sisalana, a native of Mexico. The hardy plant grows well all year round in hot climate and arid regions which are often unsuitable for other crops.

Sisal can be cultivated in most soil types except clay and has low tolerance to very moist and saline soil conditions. Dye vegetable ivory using the same dyes as other plant fibers, using fiber reactive dyes or direct dyes, or, if it will be sealed with a clear polyurethane finish, dye it like wood (see below).

Water-resistant or stain-resistant finishes. Unfortunately, items with these finishes cannot be dyed. A sisal plant produces about leaves and each leaf contains fiber bundles which are composed of 4% fiber, % cuticle, 8% dry matter and % water.

So normally a leaf weighing about g will yield about 3% by weight of fiber. dyes in the dye-bath, the dye absorbtion on the fibre varies from % to % and % to % respectively (Bhuyan et al, ).

Th e colour components isolated from most of. People have been dyeing fabric and fibers with plants for thousands of years, and you can too. In fact, chances are that you have plenty of plant material in your garden, refrigerator, and pantry.

The ramie plant has been cultivated in eastern Asia for fibre since prehistoric times. Ramie fabric was used in ancient Egypt and was known in Europe during the Middle Ages. Ramie fibre, also known as China grass, and ramie fabric, variously known as grass linen, grass cloth, or China linen, have been exported from East Asia to the Western Hemisphere since early in the 18th century, but.

Rita Buchanan’s A Dyer’s Garden: One of the best books you can buy on the subject, this book includes information on selecting plants, planting a dye garden, selecting and using mordants, and step-by-step instructions with exact measurements for dyeing yarn.

It seems to be out of print, but it’s well worth tracking down a used copy—it. Alan Miguel Brum da Silva, Sandra Maria da Luz, Irulappasamy Siva, Jebas Thangiah Winowlin Jappes, Sandro Campos Amico, An Overview on Plant Fiber Technology: An Interdisciplinary Approach, Sustainable Polymer Composites and Nanocomposites, /, (), ().

Abaca is a bust fiber. The abaca fiber is extracted from the stalk of the plant. Abaca is also known as Manila hemp. It is a Musasea family plant native to Asia and planted in humid areas including in the Philippines and East of Indonesia.

Abaca fibres are extensively used to. Sisal (Spanish pronunciation:) is a seaport town in Hunucmá Municipality in the state of Yucatán, was the principal port of Yucatán during the henequen boom, later overshadowed when the more modern port of Progreso was built to the east.

It lent its name to the agave-derived sisal fiber which was shipped through it. The town is about 53 km north north-west of Mérida, the state. Plant fibers have a recommended second step. We prefer aluminum acetate for cellulose (cotton, linen, bamboo, etc.) fibers, as well as for protein/cellulose blends, like wool/hemp, silk/bamboo and silk/cotton.

If you are dyeing plant or cellulose fibers, please scroll further down to. I have been dyeing yarn and fiber for a few years and have many books about dyeing.

I just received this book and was VERY surprised! It have become my favorite dyeing book. The book has excellent step-by-step directions for many methods of dyeing. The photography is great. There is a small section on color theory that is s: Other important properties ; cotton-m3. The cellulosic fibers ; The polymer system of cotton; bast fibers-m4.

Jute ; Fibre Composition and Morphology ; Properties of Jute Fibre ; Conversion of fibre to products ; Sisal ; Production and early processing ; Ramie ; Processing of ramie fiber ; Hemp.